ahmad azizi amdz

Hello and welcome to my homepage,

I'm Ahmad Azizi, an Online Service Developer currently living in Tehran, Iran. My interests range from photography to technology. I am also interested in travel, innovation, and gardening.

I Build & Run extensive large-scale online services, build with enthusiasm and run with excitement.

Great Words of Inspiration

  • There is nothing stranger than die in this world, so never fear to do anything. -Ahmad Azizi
  • You'll get better results by being more open to do anything disregarding the consequences, rather than to be obsessed with being selective. You may lose things, but you achieve more. -Ahmad Azizi
  • Stop looking for happiness in the same place you lose it. -Unknown
  • Sooner or later, those who win are those who think they can. -Richard Bach
  • Happiness is not something you postpone for the future; it’s something you design for the present. -Jim Rohn
  • Wherever you go, go with all your heart. Confucius
  • No matter what people call you, you are just who you are. -Dalai Lama
  • Many times the wrong train took me to the right place. -Unknown
  • Do what you can, with what you have, where you are. -Theodore Roosevelt
  • You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with. -Jim Rohn
  • Confidence comes not from always being right but from not fearing to be wrong. -Peter T. Mcintyre
  • He who is not courageous enough to take risks will accomplish nothing in life. -Muhammad Ali
  • It doesn't matter where you are coming from. All that matters is where you are going. -Brian Tracy
  • We live and we die, this is the truth that we can only face alone. No one can help us, not even the Buddha. -Dalai Lama
  • Know the rules well, so you can break them effectively. -Dalai Lama
  • The time to relax is when you don't have time for it. -Jim Goodwin
  • It always seems impossible until it's done. - Nelson Mandela
  • We can never obtain peace in the outer world until we make peace with ourselves. -Dalai Lama
  • You must be the change you wish to see in the world. -Mahatma Gandhi
  • Take into account that great love and great achievements involve great risk. -Dalai Lama
  • Some people grumble because roses have thorns; I am thankful that the thorns have roses. -Alphonse Karr
  • Whatever you believe with feeling becomes your reality. -Brian Tracy
  • Only he who can see the invisible can do the impossible. -Frank L. Gaines
  • Heaven is a state of mind, not a location. -Wayne W. Dyer
  • We must not allow other people’s limited perceptions to define us. -Virginia Satir
  • I would rather be hated for who I am than loved for who I'm not.  -Wayne W. Dyer
  • Heaven on Earth is a choice you must make, not a place you must find. -Wayne W. Dyer
  • Begin to see yourself as a soul with a body rather than a body with a soul. -Wayne W. Dyer
  • If you hear a voice within you say you cannot paint, then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced. -Vincent Van Gogh
  • The greatest weapon against stress is our ability to choose one thought over another. -William James
  • If you take responsibility for yourself you will develop a hunger to accomplish your dreams. -Les Brown
  • It is said that God created man in his own image. But it may be that humankind has created God in the image of humankind. -Thich Nhat Hanh
  • Letting go gives us freedom, and freedom is the only condition for happiness. -Thich Nhat Hanh
  • The tragedy of life is not that it ends so soon, but that we wait so long to begin it. -W.M. Lewis
  • A goal without a plan is just a wish. -Antoine de Saint Exupery
  • The best way to cheer yourself up is to try to cheer somebody else up. -Mark Twain
  • Focus on where you want to go, not on what you fear. -Tony Robbins
  • When we argue for our limitations, we get to keep them. -Evelyn Waugh

google.com/+AhmadAzizi

I am not the Ahmad Azizi poet!

If you've searched for "Ahmad Azizi" and landed to this webpage, you should be informed that this website (and my other websites) does not belong or have any relation with Ahmad Azizi poet.

This website belongs to a different identity, and by the time I'm receiving messages from people who have confused me with "Ahmad Azizi Poet", "Ahmad Azizi politician", "Dr. Ahmad Azizi" and some other Ahmad Azizis in the world.

Anyway, if you were not looking for any of the persons above, hopefully you're on the right place! That's me!

Breaking Bad

Mindset

I just thought of sharing you with some of the best concepts that I really live with everyday.

All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them. --Walt Disney
The perceived complexity of a task will expand to the time allot to it. --Parkinson's Law

 There are Lots of ideas, rules, points, laws and favorite quotes that a person likes best, but a single one is enough to change one's vision of whole life. No need for too many, a few can be enough to start a journey or survive! The most complex things, the greatest achievements have always been based on a simple but clever idea or concept.

Be wishful,
Nov 2010, Ahmad,
the AmdZ.

My Notes

  • Let's make Things Happening [Posted on 24 July 2016]
    This is an announcement post after having nothing new here over long time. I'm fully back and ready to develop exciting things.If you're living on this planet, you are on a journey of life being seeking joy and gratification, no matter you're eastern, western or Iranian. [View Full Story]
  • Nights by dots [Posted on 5 January 2013]
    Starting tonight, I'm going to add a single dot(.) at the end of this note to see how many dots I'll get at the end of this month. There is defference between deciding to do something and actually doing something and there are meanings behind every dot. Every dot means an stable state of mind at a certain time to remember some important aspects of life which I need to take action on it. [View Full Story]
  • Mission clean-up has been completed! [Posted on 10 December 2011]
    During November, AmdZ.com ran out of hosting space and I was able to free up space by 60%. [View Full Story]
  • Eliminate the anxiety of time by applying the best time management strategy [Posted on 16 May 2011]
    Time boxing is the most effective time management tool that I've found. It is about to simply fixing a time period to work on a single task or group of tasks. In this note, I'll try to introduce you to the Pomodoro technique, a great, lovely time boxing strategy that I'm applying for almost a year to manage the time. [View Full Story]
  • A whole new Look and Feel for AmdZ.com [Posted on 27 March 2009]
    AmdZ.com has a whole new look and feel since March 27, 2009. [View Full Story]

View All Notes

Recent World News

Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines


  • White Supremacists Are Using Genetic Ancestry Tests For A Creepy Purpose
    White Supremacists Are Using Genetic Ancestry Tests For A Creepy PurposeIt’s a marketing trope often repeated in viral, feel-good commercials for genetic ancestry tests: If we only knew just how related we all were, even distantly, then prejudice and racism would cease to exist.
  • U.S. Navy to remove senior leaders of warship after deadly June crash
    U.S. Navy to remove senior leaders of warship after deadly June crashBy Idrees Ali WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Navy will relieve the two senior officers and the senior enlisted sailor on a U.S. warship that collided with a Philippine container ship in June off the coast of Japan, the Navy said on Thursday, A separate official report released on Thursday contained dramatic accounts of what happened when the freighter hit the USS Fitzgerald, killing seven Navy sailors. Admiral Bill Moran, deputy chief of naval operations, told reporters that the USS Fitzgerald's commander, executive officer and master chief petty officer would be removed. Multiple U.S. and Japanese investigations are still under way into how the Fitzgerald, a guided missile destroyer, and the much larger ACX Crystal container ship collided in clear weather south of Tokyo Bay in the early hours of June 17.
  • Ex-NY governor hopeful who insulted Obamas kicked off board
    Ex-NY governor hopeful who insulted Obamas kicked off boardBUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — One-time Republican candidate for New York governor Carl Paladino, whose published insults of former President Barack Obama provoked a public uproar, was removed from Buffalo's school board Thursday for improperly discussing teacher contract negotiations.
  • Missouri State Senator Urged To Resign Over Her 'Hope' For Trump's Assassination
    Missouri State Senator Urged To Resign Over Her 'Hope' For Trump's AssassinationA Missouri state senator says she has no plans to resign ― despite loud calls from within her own party to do so ― after she said she hoped President Donald Trump would be assassinated. Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal made the comment on her Facebook page Thursday morning in response to a thread she’d started out of frustration over the white supremacist violence last weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia. While she deleted the post soon after, a screenshot of it nevertheless quickly gained traction, earning rebukes from across the political spectrum.
  • Did outing Charlottesville's white supremacists just make them more committed?
    Did outing Charlottesville's white supremacists just make them more committed?The “Unite the Right” rally on Saturday morning in Charlottesville, Virginia, was the first time 27-year-old Nigel Krofta attended a white nationalist event. He’s been active in the movement online, but last weekend he stepped out from behind his keyboard and stood clutching a billy club alongside the neo-Nazis, white nationalists, Klansmen, and other so-called alt-right marchers.  That day, Krofta met James Alex Fields Jr., who allegedly drove his car into a crowd of counter-protesters just a few hours later, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer and injuring 19 others. After the bloodshed, a photo of the two men, published by the New York Times, found its way to Twitter, where Krofta was identified by name—along with his hometown and the contact information for his employer. He was labeled an “area Nazi” by a journalist in Charleston, South Carolina, not far from Krofta’s home in Ridgeville. SEE ALSO: How you can take action against white supremacy after Charlottesville On Monday, Krofta said he started to receive threats. He was also promptly fired from his job as a welder. “My employer was being called with threats on their business and persons and they responded by discharging me,” the now-former metalworker told Mashable. “My actions and beliefs are mine and I do not want anyone to be hurt or harmed for being associated with me.” I talked to the Ridgeville man, also a white supremacist, shown next to accused murderer James Fields at rally. https://t.co/YKv5zUWscY — Michael Majchrowicz (@mjmajchrowicz) August 14, 2017 For online activists seeking to identify the marchers at Saturday’s rally, this seems like mission accomplished: A participant faced real-world consequences, outside the confines of the white nationalist movement, where having Nazi sympathies makes you a pariah. But, while activists hope the threat of shame (and unemployment) will deter racists from joining future marches, their actions could have unintended consequences: pushing neo-Nazis out of the shadows could just force them to double down.Krofta is one of multiple marchers outed by online activists: In California, Cole White reportedly resigned from his job at a hotdog restaurant after his bosses caught wind of his involvement in Charlottesville over the weekend. In Nevada, 20-year-old University of Nevada at Reno student Peter Cvjetanovic got so much publicity he went on a local news program to explain that he is “not the angry racist they see in that photo.” The photo to which he’s referring shows Cvjetanovic—and his Hitler-esque hairstyle—carrying a torch and screeching alongside other white nationalists the night before Saturday’s deadly rally. In Fargo, North Dakota, the shame of seeing his son marching with known bigots prompted a father to pen a lengthy op-ed for a local newspaper essentially disowning his racist son. “I, along with all of his siblings and his entire family, wish to loudly repudiate my son’s vile, hateful and racist rhetoric and actions,” he wrote. UPDATE: Cole White, the first person I exposed, no longer has a job ‍♂️ #GoodNightColeWhite #ExposeTheAltRight #Charlottesville pic.twitter.com/sqxSXboKw6 — Yes, You're Racist (@YesYoureRacist) August 13, 2017 The outing of racists has been met with fanfare. The Twitter page @YesYoureARacist, dedicated to shining a light on bigoted behavior, had 60,000 followers on Saturday morning—now, it has 400,000. Identifying racists has been the goal of civil rights organizations for years, with the idea that it will create problems for them in their personal and professional lives. As Southern Poverty Law Center researcher Ryan Lenz says in the documentary Welcome to Leith about the attempted neo-Nazi takeover of a small North Dakota town, “If you wanna be a Nazi, you can be a Nazi. But I’m gonna make sure the world knows you’re a Nazi.”Logan Smith, who founded the YesYoureARacist feed, put it similarly: "Ever since the days of the KKK burning crosses in people's yards, they depend on people remaining silent," Smith told NPR.  "And no matter the risk, I'm not going away." White nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the "alt-right" march toward Emancipation Park in CharlottesvilleImage: Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesYet, there’s a problem. In a world where the President of the United States says there were “very fine people” on “both sides” of Saturday’s rally, people might not care whether people know they’re aligned with white supremacists, according to several demonstrators at the rally who railed against Jews, “faggots," and other groups. In fact, according to some, being exposed is only emboldening a movement they feel has essentially been endorsed by the president of the United States. “All we're doing is massively, massively growing,” David Duke, the infamous former Ku Klux Klan leader who was at the rally in Charlottesville, told Mashable. Donald Trump mentioned Duke by name during a press conference on Tuesday where he defended the “good people” on the right who demonstrated in Charlottesville. Duke made headlines during last year’s presidential election when he endorsed Trump. It took the president nearly a week to disavow the endorsement of a notorious white supremacist—who is perhaps the most well-known white supremacist of the last 30 years and whom Trump initially claimed to know nothing about. “I’ve gotten 15 million Twitter impressions [since the rally in Charlottesville] and 90 percent have been positive,” Duke continued, adding that, “the Antifa [anti-fascist activists] might think they’re making some gains on us [by outing white nationalists] but they're not...people see through it now. They see what’s going on. They have the Internet. They saw what happened [in Charlottesville]. We weren't there for violence. We were there to make our point.”For white nationalists, Duke's mission was accomplished. Those I spoke with expressed few regrets about what happened in Charlottesville, though many claimed to not support violence. (This claim is belied by the events, which left one woman dead and dozens wounded. The governor of Virginia described the white nationalists as more heavily armed than the police.)  Outing a guy like Duke, or Richard Spencer—the de-facto leader of the “alt-right” movement—is pointless; their names are synonymous with white supremacy and a simple Google search will reveal who they are. But for people like Nigel Krofta, who stepped into the world of white nationalism and ended up unemployed and publicly dubbed a Nazi, the consequences could be more severe.Krofta, at least, doesn’t care. In fact, he says, it’s only strengthened his resolve. Asked if he considered the potential consequences of demonstrating with a group of white nationalists before Saturday, Krofta said, “Of course I did. However, it was a risk I was willing to take and I have no regrets.”Krofta said his experience in Charlottesville—and the fallout from his activities—has only encouraged him to do more. He said he plans on joining a formal white nationalist group and to continue attending rallies. For the next one, he said, he and his “alt-right” cronies will be “better prepared.”“I feel vindicated,” he said. “[Getting exposed] strengthened my resolve.” He added, “I have my own plans...I hope I do inspire more to be more active.” White nationalist demonstrators surrounded by counter demonstrators in Charlottesville.Image: AP/REX/ShutterstockThe gloating and positive spin on what happened in Charlottesville is not unexpected, says Oren Segal, director of the Anti-Defamation League’s Center on Extremism, who tracks white nationalist groups like the “alt-right” and the National Socialist Movement, the country’s primary neo-Nazi organization.“Duke, Spencer and others will surely try to leverage this moment to double-down on their fantasies of creating a white civil rights movement,” Segal said. He added, “Generally, the people who show up to rallies have already taken the leap [into unabashed white nationalism]...there are some unintended consequences to [publicly name them] that can backfire. White supremacists generally don’t miss an opportunity to portray themselves as the victims.”That’s exactly what happened. People like Duke and Spencer have spent the last few days playing the victim on social media and beyond. President Trump appears to be paying attention to the plight of the poor white nationalists, as evidenced by that insane press conference on Tuesday, in which Trump repeatedly emphasized that both sides had done wrong.Krofta also doesn’t have much faith in the identification tactics of the “alt-right’s” opposition in terms of keeping people from upcoming rallies. While he concedes that people may be “afraid to show [once they] realize that all it takes is one photo to ruin their life,” he’s quick to add that he doesn’t fall into that camp. “My life has not been ruined,” he said.Efforts to identify participants could still deter some. On Aug. 19, a group of “free speech activists” with tentacles in the “alt-right” sphere are planning a rally in Boston. After the chaos in Virginia, speakers began to pull out of the event in fear of being publicly linked to the “alt-right.” The group has publicly disavowed the rally in Charlottesville and insists that their organization is in no way affiliated with people like Duke or Spencer. But the rally is still a target for Antifa activists, who believe it’s an extension of what happened in Charlottesville. "Yes, there is concern of doxxing and spreading of false information about people to cost them their careers," an unidentified administrator of the group’s Facebook page said. “In fact, one of our members lost his job due to this defamation already.” The rally in Boston is scheduled to go forth as of this writing, despite rumors that it had been canceled.For Krofta, his new-found infamy has only pushed him further into the world of white nationalism. As for his new buddy, alleged killer James Fields Jr., Krofta said he doesn’t think his actions were premeditated. But he declined to condemn the alleged murder. Rather, Krofta excused it.“I think people have to understand that the protesters had every street blocked and we were surrounded,” he said. “They also had the parking garage blocked and surrounded. [He] was most likely looking for a way out of there.”He added, “[Fields] did not have any plans to [slam his car through a crowd of people] to my knowledge...that is a very expensive car.” If you’re looking for direct ways to take action after the Charlottesville violence, we’ve identified five things you can do right now .
  • Here's a Preview of the Solar Eclipse Traffic Nightmare
    Here's a Preview of the Solar Eclipse Traffic NightmareThe backup in Oregon was between 20 and 30 miles long
  • Southern anger: Nazis, KKK 'hijacking' Confederate debate
    Southern anger: Nazis, KKK 'hijacking' Confederate debateCHULAFINNEE, Ala. (AP) — White Southerners who equate Old South symbols with regional pride rather than hate are even more on the defensive since neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klansmen and other extremists became the face of the fight over Confederate monuments.
  • KKK leader threatens to 'burn' black Latina journalist and calls her a 'n*****' during interview
    KKK leader threatens to 'burn' black Latina journalist and calls her a 'n*****' during interviewAn Afro-Latina journalist conducting an interview with a member of the Ku Klux Klan has said he threatened her so violently that she was concerned for her safety. Ilia Calderón, a Univision journalist with both African and Colombian heritage, agreed to visit KKK leader Chris Barker on his wooded North Carolina property. Almost immediately, Mr Barker asked her why she didn’t “go back” to her country of origin.
  • Barack Obama responds to Barcelona terror attack: 'Un abrazo'
    Barack Obama responds to Barcelona terror attack: 'Un abrazo'Barack Obama and the former First Lady Michelle have sent a message of support - and a hug - to the people of Barcelona and Spain after a terror attack that killed at least 13 people and injured scores more. “Michelle and I are thinking of the victims and their families in Barcelona. Americans will always stand with our Spanish friends,” he wrote.
  • New York to axe Confederate busts from 'hall of fame'
    New York to axe Confederate busts from 'hall of fame'New York authorities are taking steps to remove two busts of Confederate commanders from a "Hall of Fame" as America's most populous city joins others in erasing symbols of the pro-slavery Civil War South. Bronx Community College said the bust of General Robert E. Lee, the commander of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, and another of one of his top generals, Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, would be removed in two to three days. "We want to make it sure we get it done quickly, but without causing damage," said Karla Williams, executive legal counsel at the College, which is part of The City University of New York.